Lifestyle and Mental Health: Restoring Sanity in the 21st Century

Roger Walsh Lifestyle, Perspectives, Presentations, Psychology, Video Leave a Comment

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The 21st century is becoming an increasingly bizarre time, when a significant portion of humanity seems to be conducting a massive, unprecedented, world-wide lifestyle experiment. As Roger discusses in this video, people are spending more and more time indoors in artificial, nature free environments, with low-level artificial lighting. We are eating high calorie and nutrient-poor diets, and tend to get very little exercise compared to previous generations. We are completely and totally immersed in the online multimedia world, and exist as parts of huge, largely impersonal, often anonymous communities like Facebook, Reddit, or Twitter.

In other words, today’s human beings are living very differently than their ancestors—and truth be told, we are only beginning to understand the impact this is having upon us. While there are certainly numerous benefits to our hyper-modernized world, it is clear that there are some detrimental effects as well—depression, anxiety, illness, etc. In this video, Roger describes eight of the most crucial lifestyle-based approaches to help restore balance and sanity to our frantic 21st-century lives.

Dr. Roger Walsh’s groundbreaking article “Lifestyle and Mental Health” was published by the prestigious and highly-influential academic journal American Psychologist. In the article, Roger explores the power of simple “therapeutic lifestyle changes” (or TLC’s) to significantly improve our overall mental health and happiness, offering a simple but comprehensive overview that could potentially transform the entire field of medicine and healthcare.

To listen to Roger and Ken discuss this fascinating article, click here.

Getting more exercise, spending time outdoors and helping others are among the activities that can be as effective as drugs or counseling in treating an array of mental illnesses, including depression and anxiety, according to a UC Irvine study.

In determining this, Dr. Roger Walsh, professor of psychiatry & human behavior, philosophy and anthropology, as well as adjunct professor of religious studies, reviewed research on the effects of what he calls “therapeutic lifestyle changes.” Other TLCs might relate to nutrition, relationships, recreation, relaxation, and religious or spiritual involvement.

“I found that lifestyle changes can offer significant advantages for patients, therapists and societies, yet they’re insufficiently appreciated, taught or utilized,” Walsh said. “TLCs can be effective, inexpensive and enjoyable, with fewer side effects and complications than medications. In the 21st century, therapeutic lifestyles may need to be a central focus of mental, medical and public health.”

Study results appear online in American Psychologist, the flagship journal of the American Psychological Association. Among Walsh’s findings:

  • Exercise doesn’t just boost people’s sense of well-being. It can help children do better in school, improve cognitive performance in adults, reduce age-related memory loss in the elderly, and increase neuron formation in the brain.
  • Diets with plenty of fruits, vegetables and fish may enhance kids’ school performance, help maintain cognitive function in adults, and reduce symptoms in schizophrenic and affective disorders.
  • Spending time in nature can promote cognitive function and overall well-being.
  • Good relationships can reduce health risks ranging from the common cold to strokes, as well as multiple mental illnesses, and can dramatically improve psychological health.
  • Recreation and fun can lessen defensiveness and foster social skills.
  • Relaxation and stress management can treat a variety of anxiety, insomnia and panic disorders.
  • Meditation can enhance empathy and emotional stability; decrease stress and burnout; and boost cognitive function and even brain size.
  • Religious or spiritual involvement that focuses on love and forgiveness can promote well-being and reduce anxiety, depression and substance abuse.
  • Contribution and service, or altruism, can foster joy and generosity, benefit both physical and mental health, and perhaps even extend lifespan. A major exception, Walsh noted, is “caretaker burnout experienced by overwhelmed family members caring for a demented spouse or parent.”

Obstacles to TLCs, he said, are the sustained effort they require and “a passive expectation that healing comes from an outside authority or a pill.” Walsh also observed that people contend with a daily barrage of psychologically sophisticated advertisements that promote unhealthy lifestyle behaviors such as smoking, drinking alcohol and eating fast food.

“You can never get enough of what you don’t really need, but you can certainly ruin your life and health trying,” he added.

Text from UCIrving Today

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Roger Walsh

About Roger Walsh

Roger Walsh, M.D., Ph.D., has spent nearly a quarter century researching and practicing in the world's great spiritual traditions. His critically acclaimed book, Essential Spirituality, is a summary of that wisdom, outlining the seven spiritual practices common to the world's major religions.

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