Diane Musho Hamilton


Diane Musho Hamilton

Diane Musho Hamilton is a gifted professional mediator, author, master Integral Facilitator,, and teacher of Zen and Integral Spirituality.

She has been a practitioner of meditation for more than 30 years. Diane facilitates Big Mind Big Heart, a process that elicits the insights of Zen in Western audiences. Diane is considered a pioneer in articulating and applying the insights of an Integral Life Practice. She has worked with Ken Wilber and the Integral Institute in Denver, Colorado, since 2004.

In 2009 Diane established Two Arrows Zen, a center for Zen practice in Salt Lake City and Torrey, Utah with her husband Michael Mugaku Zimmerman. And most recently, in 2012 she co-founded Integral Facilitator, her uniquely developmental approach to group facilitation mastery.

She is the mother of four children, and the best friend of Ali, the Wonder Dog.

Diane is the author of Everything is Workable: A Zen Approach to Conflict Resolution (Shambhala Publications), which applies mindfulness to the inevitable interpersonal conflicts that arise in all areas of life.  She is also featured in The Hidden Lamp: Stories from Twenty-Five Centuries of Awakened Women, (Wisdom Publications).


Contributions

Mon, 04/21/2014
Video

Helen offers a stunning presentation about the narrative tradition of the Enneagram, taking us on a guided journey into the experience of archaic peoples the world over who accomplished great feats by following their instincts.

Sun, 01/19/2014
Video

Tibetan Buddhism is unique among religious traditions for its “turnings,” the recognition of its own evolutionary unfolding. Whereas most of the world’s religious institutions are purposely designed to preserve tradition and withstand the pressures of an ever-changing world, Buddhism is often praised for its ability to evolve as new knowledge and wisdom comes to light. Is Buddhism now ripe for yet another turning of the wheel?

Sun, 11/24/2013
Audio

Diane Musho Hamilton talks to Ken Wilber about her new book, Everything Is Workable: A Zen Approach to Conflict Resolution.

Tue, 07/02/2013
Audio

What are the deeper meanings of the virtues that are in tension—transparency vs. privacy and security vs. freedom? Have we entered the post-privacy world? Does our public persona compromise our basic authenticity? What is evolution up to?

Mon, 10/01/2012
Article
Integral Post

What is it that we are seeking? Some people I have worked with seek the truth. Some seek peace; others, enlightenment, love, union, realization. Sometimes, we don’t know what we are seeking, but we are drawn to something greater than ourselves. It is hard to express this desire with a word because words are inadequate. But the feeling of yearning or longing is unmistakable. When did you become a seeker? What were the circumstances? Have things changed since you began your search? What have you found? How is your seeking different now than some years ago?

Wed, 04/18/2012
Article
Integral Post

Ken Wilber has articulated the power of three primary dimensions to our spiritual life: I, We, and It. These perspectives are framed by our use of language, and so close to us we often don’t see them. Yet every sentence I speak somehow refers to them, and with practice, each perspective discloses an important aspect of our spiritual experience....

Tue, 06/14/2011
Article
Integral Post

"Yours is a creative life. Like the Kosmos itself, you are endowed with the supreme capacity to bring things into form. Whether you use it or not, you were born with a remarkable ability to tap into the source of all that is, and to imagine new things—ideas, visions, and possibilities. Creativity will make demands of you in terms of learning to shape and refine these new forms...."

Wed, 04/27/2011
Article
Integral Post

In short, people at Second Tier are creative. When you look around at the people in the Integral network, the truth of this seems to bear out. Luckily, from the Integral viewpoint, we can see that innovation and preservation are necessary to each other in the evolving life of a tradition.

Tue, 03/29/2011
Article
Integral Post

Last week I saw a list of the Top 100 Spiritual Teachers published by the Watkins Review. I had never heard of this publication, but I like a good list like the next person, so checked I it out. Their criteria for being included is that the person “has to be alive, to have made a spiritual contribution on a global scale, are frequently googled, appearing in the Nielsen Data and highlighted throughout the blogsphere.”

Mon, 02/21/2011
Article
Integral Post

I have been listening to a lot of discussions on the web recently about ethical violations of Zen teachers, about their breaches of trust, and lack of good faith in how they have treated the people they purport to be guiding. The heated complaints elicit an outcry of responses calling for the development of standards, guidelines, sound and consistent ethical policies which can provide oversight and accountability to the teachers in the Zen world. This is so that teachers and students alike are held accountable to the impacts that their decisions and behavior have on the communities in which they practice.